Thursday, August 30, 2012

4 Simple Steps To Avoid

First of all please notice that some explanations in my article are from a 'viewpoint' of European Times. You will know what I mean when you read my article.
AND I am German and have some misspelled words, grammar and phrases. I am still developing my skills, but just don't look at this, look at the content itself, and you will be happy. ;-)
So go ahead now, I just want you to recognize it. ;-)
1. Adjust your biological clock
The biological clock of the body needs a while after a journey into another time belt, in order to adjust itself to the new rhythm. Physical and mental symptoms can occur here such as headache, listlessness or nausea, but none jet lag must be helplessly delivered.
Daylight helps itself the cells, automatically to program on 'Day'. When you fly in direction to the east, for example to Thailand, it might be harder for you - you lose several hours. In order to prepare some days in advance for the new sleep rhythm, you should spend some time in the daylight in the early evening. During the flight it is advisable to sleep in advance. Then the adjustment goes faster.
When you travel toward the west, approximately to the USA, you'll have it easier. Nevertheless you should try to plan its arrival around noon time to get the brightest light of the day. Important appointments or activities at the arrival place you should plan at the time of day, at which you are most awake: After a flight in direction to the east in the evening, after a flight in direction to the west in the morning.
2. Sleep on board
Many humans have problems to fall asleep on the tiny seat in the airplane. Therefore in such a way some seizes to sleep pills or tranquilizers. This unnatural interference into the bio rhythm of the body affects negatively to your adjustment at recent time conditions.
It is healthier to create yourself in the airplane as good sleep conditions as possible: Take yourself an inflatable neck cushion and an eye mask in the airplane. Some airlines distribute themselves these implements on board, but you shouldn't rely on it however.
Since feet often swell on a flight, it is advisable to take your shoes off and to carry yourself on a warm cosy pair of socks. Even if you feel yourself it's not cold, you should cover yourselves before falling asleep with a light cover (you'll get one by all long distance flights), so that you do not wake up freezing and protect yourself from a cold!
I for myself know what I'm talking about. I have seen many people who underestimated this point and had a cold at their additional days after their flight.
3. Avoid drinking alcohol as your 'falling-asleep-assistance'
Tiny alcohol bottles on board often used as a falling asleep assistance during the flight. In the airplane these affect however - exactly the same as tranquilizers - three times as strongly as down on the earth! If you are suffering from fear of flight you should avoid alcohol here, since psychological symptoms can occur such as aggression or depression (however, this is an extensive subject. I will post an article about this in the future. For now I focus on 'jet lag').
In addition alcohol supports the drainage of the body, which particularly begins fast on long distance flights. As consequence headache and listlessness appear. The air within an airplane is often drier than in the desert! While the air humidity of the Sahara amounts to about 20 per cent, it occurs at long distance flights that it falls below the ten-per cent border. Therefore you should drink much water during, before and after the flight.
Professionals take beverages themselves
In many cases the water on board isn't particularly good-tasting and is served in containers by the size of an egg cup. You won't to constantly trouble a flight attendant with your desires. Therefore take yourself also a large bottle of your preferential mineral water on board.
Last but not least: my most important advice:
4. Sleeping in advance to the trip
To the complete habituation time of your body the following rule of thumb applies:
One day per hour time lag. With a difference of six hours that would be six days, until the biological clock of the body ticks in conformity with the time belt. When you then precautionary go to bed one our earlier/later per day, your body get used to the new daytime.
Enjoy your trip!

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Partnering for Health

Sara's one-hour surgery took three and a half hours. The doctor's promise of "no pain" was a lie. The promise of "only one incision" was, too. The "four-hour easy recovery" actually involved 24 hours in ICU. We are only home now because we have life support equipment.
Sara's mad at us, but she'll get over it. I even expect her to smile again soon. But for now, every time a family member comes to visit her, Sara simply must tell them all about her hospital visit, making full use of her hoarse voice and her cutest pout.
As for the family, we're hoping that the vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) surgery proves to be the promised cure for seizures. The VNS is like a pacemaker, stimulating a nerve in the neck, and we've heard that many patients with intractable seizures have benefited from this device.
The previous week. . .
Like many parents waiting for a doctor to come out after surgery, my husband and I became agitated when the doctor didn't appear until hours after the estimated time. When he finally came out, he told us that everything was all right, but that nothing had gone the way it had been planned, which didn't put us in high spirits.
The doctor promised that we could go back and see our daughter in an hour, but after two hours had passed, my fear level had increased, and I grew more hostile. I pestered the young man at the information desk until I finally got to speak to Sara's nurse on the phone. By the time they let me into the recovery room, I was an emotional tornado, spinning black clouds around everyone who came near me.
Sara was more than mad; she was scared and in extreme pain. The doctors couldn't remove the intubation tube because Sara wasn't able to breathe on her own, and she couldn't have pain medication because her blood pressure wasn't stable. She was on the verge of hypothermia with a temperature of 88.
"I don't think she's getting the best care," I said to the nurse. That was a mistake. As soon as I blurted this out, I thought: "Careful, they can kick me out of here anytime they want to."
I guess I should have been a nurse instead of an interior designer.
In Surviving Healthcare: How to Take Charge and Get the Best from Your Doctor, Your Hospital, and Your Health Insurance, Pam Armstrong says, "Remember, you should know about and have a say in everything that happens to your body while you are in a hospital. Your health should always be the focus of your care. Hospital routines should serve your needs, not the staff's or hospital's needs. Don't let yourself be intimidated by hospital staff who seem to feel otherwise. To get the best care, combine assertiveness with a partnering and empathetic approach toward staff, who may have overfull workloads."
When the patient is a child or is otherwise unable to speak for themselves, a family member must work in partnership with the hospital staff to make sure the patient gets the best care. I learned years ago that hysterical outbursts at nurses and other hospital staff do little for my daughter. I've learned to keep my mouth shut, to think first, and then to speak gently. That doesn't mean that what I say doesn't count--I've just learned a few key phrases that will show the hospital staff that I know what type of care my daughter needs.
After mothering Sara (requesting heated blankets, wiping tears, and straightening her legs), I explained my fears to the nurse. Apologizing for my outburst, I told the nurse how scared we were because the surgery had taken longer and had been more involved than had been planned, and because Sara was in pain. Instead of telling me to leave the recovery room, the nurse agreed to let my husband come in, too.
Acknowledging my fears and keeping my mouth closed helped our daughter receive the best care during her hospital stay. Sara, at twenty-five, still needs total care because of disabilities. Instead of placing Sara in an adult intensive care unit with many patients and limited visiting hours, Sara was moved to Pediatric ICU, where the ratio of patients to nurses is only two to one. There was also newer equipment, but best of all, they allowed me to sleep in her private room.
You too can learn to help care for a loved one when they're faced with hospitalization. Just remember to partner with the physicians and hospital staff to ensure that your loved one will get the best care.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

6 Healthy Eating Tips for Active Adults

Adequate Carbs!
With the latest low carb trend it can become difficult, to say the least, to figure out what you should be eating especially if you are active! The truth is, when you exercise your muscle burns a type of carbohydrate called glycogen for fuel. To keep these important fuel levels optimal for peak performance, we must eat a diet rich in whole grains, beans, potatoes, and other high-carbohydrate foods. You can't produce optimal glycogen stores with a high protein low carbohydrate diet. Go for the whole grains such as 100% whole wheat breads, brown rice, quinoa, or millet. Limit the 'white' refined products.
Yes it is true, active people need more protein than the average person. It is especially important after our workouts to repair muscle damage. Include lean meats, fish, soy, and eggs. Active people need about 3-4 three-ounce servings a day.
Eat Your Fruits and Veggies!
When you exercise, you breathe harder taking in more oxygen. While you need oxygen to support life, it can become unstable in the body. Unstable oxygen can oxidize and damage your muscle cells which can bring on inflammation and soreness. You can protect yourself from oxidation by eating healthful amounts of antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables. Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day!
Drink, Drink, Drink
The more you exercise, the more you sweat. Replacing these fluids is vital for peak performance and endurance. During long workouts you may need a sports drink that contains carbohydrates and electrolytes. Drink at least 8-10 servings of fluids/day.
Fueling Before A Workout
This step alone will not only lengthen your workout but it will also increase your performance which is key when training for an event. If you don't eat before exercise you will likely feel light-headedness, fatigue, and nausea. In addition, your body turns to muscle protein for fuel because it doesn't have enough carbohydrate. By starting your workout well-fueled, your body will burn a combination of the carbohydrate stored in your muscles and stored fat. Eat 2-4 hours before a workout or event. Choose a high carbohydrate, low fat, moderate protein meal or snack. Drink at least 10 ounces of water to help offset sweat loss during your workout.
Fueling After A Workout
It is important to consume calories and fluids during the first half hour after you exercise for optimal recovery. If you aren't hungry right away a quick snack will do. Drinking a sports drink or 100% fruit juice will do the trick! Don't forget to eat a meal later with protein to repair muscle damage.

Friday, August 3, 2012

Preventing Us from Developing Healthy Lifestyle Habits

The air we breathe, the water we drink, and even the foods we eat, contain substances that may be damaging to our cells, according to Public Health scientists who have found new evidence of the threats that our toxic environment pose on our cellular health. Apparently, any tissue that is exposed to the environment, including the skin and gastrointestinal passages, is especially vulnerable.
While government agencies and industry are taking steps to control additional releases into the environment, many toxic substances become concentrated in fatty tissues through a process called bioaccumulation. Animal fats in the diet present health problems in other ways. Dr. Myron Wentz, Ph.D., immunologist and microbiologist, hypothesizes that foods with high peroxide values, especially processed, fatty foods, generate "free radicals" that in turn damage healthy cells. Researchers believe that supplementary antioxidants are necessary for combating these free radicals in addition to the body's normal defense systems.
In addition to the health threats posed by toxic substances today, many nutritional scientists point out that much of our food has been over processed and preservatives have been added for packaging, affecting its vitamin and mineral content. In fact many of us are undernourished because our diet lacks many of the important vitamins and minerals necessary for health.
One recent study found that nearly one-third of the calories in the typical American diet come from nutrient-deficient junk food. In contrast, healthy foods, such as vegetables and fruits, make up only about ten percent of the caloric intake. Furthermore, poor diet, coupled with physical inactivity, is now recognized by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention as one of the leading causes of death in the U. S. today because without proper nutrition, the cells of the body are less able to prevent and repair cellular damage.
"The human body is made of cells, and those cells work together to sustain your life," says Dr. Wentz. "Taking antioxidants with food may help reduce the formation of oxidized lipids." Other medical professionals concur on the importance of taking supplementation.
* "One way to effectively maintain health is to supplement our diets with a full range of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants," so explains Dr. Ladd McNamara, an obstetrician/gynecologist in Atlanta, Georgia.
* Dr. Ray Strand, M.D., a family practitioner in South Dakota, states, "The concerns for my patients' health has led me to recommend a complete nutritional system to my patients."
Remember: When you are maximizing your body's health potential, we everyone wins. When you don't, we all lose.
© MMVIII, Etienne A. Gibbs, MSW, Internet Safety Advocate and Educator.
Permission to Republish: This article may be republished in ezines, magazines, newsletters, and on blogs and websites provided attribution is provided to the author, and it appears with the included copyright, resource box, and live web site link. Use of this article in any media that promotes or utilizes child pornography, fraud, trafficking in obscene material, drug dealing, gambling, harassment, stalking, spamming, spimming, sending of viruses or other harmful files, copyright infringement, patent infringement, or theft of trade secrets, among others is strictly prohibited. Such use will be persecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
Etienne A. Gibbs, Internet Security Advocate and Educator, consults with individuals, small business owners, and home-business entrepreneurs regarding online protection against spyware, viruses, hackers, and other pc-disabling cybercrimes. For more information, visit